1. Age-associated de-repression of retrotransposons in the Drosophila fat body, its potential cause and consequence.

    Aging Cell 15(3):542 (2016) PMID 27072046 PMCID PMC4854910

    Eukaryotic genomes contain transposable elements (TE) that can move into new locations upon activation. Since uncontrolled transposition of TEs, including the retrotransposons and DNA transposons, can lead to DNA breaks and genomic instability, multiple mechanisms, including heterochromatin-medi...
  2. Lamin in inflammation and aging.

    Current Opinion in Cell Biology 40:124 (2016) PMID 27023494 PMCID PMC4887417

    Aging is characterized by a progressive loss of tissue function and an increased susceptibility to injury and disease. Many age-associated pathologies manifest an inflammatory component, and this has led to the speculation that aging is at least in part caused by some form of inflammation. Howev...
  3. TelCoVis: Visual Exploration of Co-occurrence in Urban Human Mobility Based on Telco Data.

    Visualization and Computer Graphics, IEEE Trans... 22(1):935 (2016) PMID 26469282

    Understanding co-occurrence in urban human mobility (i.e. people from two regions visit an urban place during the same time span) is of great value in a variety of applications, such as urban planning, business intelligence, social behavior analysis, as well as containing contagious diseases. In...
  4. Low-Cell-Number Epigenome Profiling Aids the Study of Lens Aging and Hematopoiesis.

    Cell Reports 13(7):1505 (2015) PMID 26549448

    Understanding how chromatin modification regulates development and disease can be limited by available material. Despite recent progress, balancing high-quality and reliable mapping using chromatin-immunoprecipitation-based deep sequencing (ChIP-seq) remains a challenge. We report two techniques...
  5. Structural organization of nuclear lamins A, C, B1, and B2 revealed by superresolution microscopy.

    Molecular Biology of the Cell 26(22):4075 (2015) PMID 26310440 PMCID PMC4710238

    The nuclear lamina is a key structural element of the metazoan nucleus. However, the structural organization of the major proteins composing the lamina is poorly defined. Using three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy and computational image analysis, we characterized the supramolecu...
  6. RanGTP aids anaphase entry through Ubr5-mediated protein turnover.

    Journal of Cell Biology 211(1):7 (2015) PMID 26438829 PMCID PMC4602037

    RanGTP is known to regulate the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), but the underlying molecular mechanism is unclear. BuGZ stabilizes SAC protein Bub3 through direct interaction and facilitates its mitotic function. Here we show that RanGTP promotes the turnover of BuGZ and Bub3 in metaphase, wh...
  7. Lamins position the nuclear pores and centrosomes by modulating dynein.

    Molecular Biology of the Cell 26(19):3379 (2015) PMID 26246603 PMCID PMC4591684

    Lamins, the type V nuclear intermediate filament proteins, are reported to function in both interphase and mitosis. For example, lamin deletion in various cell types can lead to an uneven distribution of the nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) in the interphase nuclear envelope, whereas deletion of B-...
  8. Phase transition of spindle-associated protein regulate spindle apparatus assembly.

    Cell 163(1):108 (2015) PMID 26388440 PMCID PMC4607269

    Spindle assembly required during mitosis depends on microtubule polymerization. We demonstrate that the evolutionarily conserved low-complexity protein, BuGZ, undergoes phase transition or coacervation to promote assembly of both spindles and their associated components. BuGZ forms temperature-d...
  9. Age-Associated Loss of Lamin-B Leads to Systemic Inflammation and Gut Hyperplasia

    Cell 163(1):256 (2015)

  10. γ-Tubulin complexes in microtubule nucleation and beyond.

    Molecular Biology of the Cell 26(17):2957 (2015) PMID 26316498 PMCID PMC4551311

    Tremendous progress has been made in understanding the functions of γ-tubulin and, in particular, its role in microtubule nucleation since the publication of its discovery in 1989. The structure of γ-tubulin has been determined, and the components of γ-tubulin complexes have been identified. Sig...
  11. Identification of lamin B-regulated chromatin regions based on chromatin landscapes.

    Molecular Biology of the Cell 26(14):2685 (2015) PMID 25995381 PMCID PMC4501365

    Lamins, the major structural components of the nuclear lamina (NL) found beneath the nuclear envelope, are known to interact with most of the nuclear peripheral chromatin in metazoan cells. Although NL-chromatin associations correlate with a repressive chromatin state, the role of lamins in teth...
  12. Splicing function of mitotic regulators links R-loop-mediated DNA damage to tumor cell killing.

    Journal of Cell Biology 209(2):235 (2015) PMID 25918225 PMCID PMC4411280

    Although studies suggest that perturbing mitotic progression leads to DNA damage and p53 activation, which in turn lead to either cell apoptosis or senescence, it remains unclear how mitotic defects trigger p53 activation. We show that BuGZ and Bub3, which are two mitotic regulators localized in...
  13. Lamin-B in systemic inflammation, tissue homeostasis, and aging.

    Nucleus (Austin, Tex. : Print) 6(3):183 (2015) PMID 25875575 PMCID PMC4615766

    Gradual loss of tissue function (or homeostasis) is a natural process of aging and is believed to cause many age-associated diseases. In human epidemiology studies, the low-grade and chronic systemic inflammation in elderly has been correlated with the development of aging related pathologies. A...
  14. Age-associated loss of lamin-B leads to systemic inflammation and gut hyperplasia.

    Cell 159(4):829 (2014) PMID 25417159 PMCID PMC4243052

    Aging of immune organs, termed as immunosenescence, is suspected to promote systemic inflammation and age-associated disease. The cause of immunosenescence and how it promotes disease, however, has remained unclear. We report that the Drosophila fat body, a major immune organ, undergoes immunose...
  15. A computational model for the formation of lamin-B mitotic spindle envelope and matrix.

    Interface Focus 4(3):20130063 (2014) PMID 24904732 PMCID PMC3996581

    Recent reports show that, after nuclear envelope breakdown, lamin-B, a component of the nuclear lamina in interphase, localizes around the mitotic spindle as a membranous network. How this process occurs, however, and how it influences mitotic spindle morphogenesis is unclear. Here, we develop a...
  16. Concentration-dependent lamin assembly and its roles in the localization of other nuclear proteins.

    Molecular Biology of the Cell 25(8):1287 (2014) PMID 24523288 PMCID PMC3982994

    The nuclear lamina (NL) consists of lamin polymers and proteins that bind to the polymers. Disruption of NL proteins such as lamin and emerin leads to developmental defects and human diseases. However, the expression of multiple lamins, including lamin-A/C, lamin-B1, and lamin-B2, in mammals has...
  17. Borg5 is required for angiogenesis by regulating persistent directional migration of the cardiac microvascular endothelial cells.

    Molecular Biology of the Cell 25(6):841 (2014) PMID 24451259 PMCID PMC3952853

    The microvasculature is important for vertebrate organ development and homeostasis. However, the molecular mechanism of microvascular angiogenesis remains incompletely understood. Through studying Borg5 (Binder of the Rho GTPase 5), which belongs to a family of poorly understood effector protein...
  18. A microtubule-associated zinc finger protein, BuGZ, regulates mitotic chromosome alignment by ensuring Bub3 stability and kinetochore targeting.

    Developmental Cell 28(3):268 (2014) PMID 24462186 PMCID PMC3927447

    Equal chromosome segregation requires proper assembly of many proteins, including Bub3, onto kinetochores to promote kinetochore-microtubule interactions. By screening for mitotic regulators in the spindle envelope and matrix (Spemix), we identify a conserved Bub3 interacting and GLE-2-binding s...
  19. Nuclear lamina builds tissues from the stem cell niche.

    Fly 8(2):63 (2014) PMID 25483250 PMCID PMC4197016

    Recent studies show that nuclear lamins, the type V intermediate filament proteins, are required for proper building of at least some organs. As the major structural components of the nuclear lamina found underneath the inner nuclear membranes, lamins are ubiquitously expressed in all animal cel...
  20. Proliferation and differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells lacking all lamins.

    Cell Research 23(12):1420 (2013) PMID 23979018 PMCID PMC3847566