1. Control of brain development, function, and behavior by the microbiome.

    Cell Host & Microbe 17(5):565 (2015) PMID 25974299 PMCID PMC4442490

    Animals share an intimate and life-long partnership with a myriad of resident microbial species, collectively referred to as the microbiota. Symbiotic microbes have been shown to regulate nutrition and metabolism and are critical for the development and function of the immune system. More recent...
  2. Indigenous bacteria from the gut microbiota regulate host serotonin biosynthesis.

    Cell 161(2):264 (2015) PMID 25860609 PMCID PMC4393509

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract contains much of the body's serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT), but mechanisms controlling the metabolism of gut-derived 5-HT remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the microbiota plays a critical role in regulating host 5-HT. Indigenous spore-forming bacter...
  3. Gut microbes and the brain: paradigm shift in neuroscience.

    Journal of Neuroscience 34(46):15490 (2014) PMID 25392516 PMCID PMC4228144

    The discovery of the size and complexity of the human microbiome has resulted in an ongoing reevaluation of many concepts of health and disease, including diseases affecting the CNS. A growing body of preclinical literature has demonstrated bidirectional signaling between the brain and the gut m...
  4. Gut microbes and the brain: paradigm shift in neuroscience.

    Journal of Neuroscience 34(46):15490 (2014) PMID 25392516 PMCID PMC4228144

    The discovery of the size and complexity of the human microbiome has resulted in an ongoing reevaluation of many concepts of health and disease, including diseases affecting the CNS. A growing body of preclinical literature has demonstrated bidirectional signaling between the brain and the gut m...
  5. Gut microbes and the brain: paradigm shift in neuroscience.

    Journal of Neuroscience 34(46):15490 (2014) PMID 25392516 PMCID PMC4228144

    The discovery of the size and complexity of the human microbiome has resulted in an ongoing reevaluation of many concepts of health and disease, including diseases affecting the CNS. A growing body of preclinical literature has demonstrated bidirectional signaling between the brain and the gut m...
  6. Gut microbes and the brain: paradigm shift in neuroscience.

    Journal of Neuroscience 34(46):15490 (2014) PMID 25392516 PMCID PMC4228144

    The discovery of the size and complexity of the human microbiome has resulted in an ongoing reevaluation of many concepts of health and disease, including diseases affecting the CNS. A growing body of preclinical literature has demonstrated bidirectional signaling between the brain and the gut m...
  7. Specialized metabolites from the microbiome in health and disease.

    Cell Metabolism 20(5):719 (2014) PMID 25440054 PMCID PMC4337795

    The microbiota, and the genes that comprise its microbiome, play key roles in human health. Host-microbe interactions affect immunity, metabolism, development, and behavior, and dysbiosis of gut bacteria contributes to disease. Despite advances in correlating changes in the microbiota with vario...
  8. Specialized metabolites from the microbiome in health and disease.

    Cell Metabolism 20(5):719 (2014) PMID 25440054

    The microbiota, and the genes that comprise its microbiome, play key roles in human health. Host-microbe interactions affect immunity, metabolism, development, and behavior, and dysbiosis of gut bacteria contributes to disease. Despite advances in correlating changes in the microbiota with vario...
  9. Specialized metabolites from the microbiome in health and disease.

    Cell Metabolism 20(5):719 (2014) PMID 25440054 PMCID PMC4337795

    The microbiota, and the genes that comprise its microbiome, play key roles in human health. Host-microbe interactions affect immunity, metabolism, development, and behavior, and dysbiosis of gut bacteria contributes to disease. Despite advances in correlating changes in the microbiota with vario...
  10. Specialized metabolites from the microbiome in health and disease.

    Cell Metabolism 20(5):719 (2014) PMID 25440054

    The microbiota, and the genes that comprise its microbiome, play key roles in human health. Host-microbe interactions affect immunity, metabolism, development, and behavior, and dysbiosis of gut bacteria contributes to disease. Despite advances in correlating changes in the microbiota with vario...
  11. Specialized metabolites from the microbiome in health and disease.

    Cell Metabolism 20(5):719 (2014) PMID 25440054

    The microbiota, and the genes that comprise its microbiome, play key roles in human health. Host-microbe interactions affect immunity, metabolism, development, and behavior, and dysbiosis of gut bacteria contributes to disease. Despite advances in correlating changes in the microbiota with vario...
  12. Specialized metabolites from the microbiome in health and disease.

    Cell Metabolism 20(5):719 (2014) PMID 25440054

    The microbiota, and the genes that comprise its microbiome, play key roles in human health. Host-microbe interactions affect immunity, metabolism, development, and behavior, and dysbiosis of gut bacteria contributes to disease. Despite advances in correlating changes in the microbiota with vario...
  13. Indigenous bacteria from the gut microbiota regulate host serotonin biosynthesis

    Cell (2014)

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract contains much of the body’s serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT), but mechanisms controlling the metabolism of gut-derived 5-HT remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that the microbiota plays a critical role in regulating host 5-HT. Indigenous spore-formi...
  14. Commensal bacteria protect against food allergen sensitization.

    PNAS 111(36):13145 (2014) PMID 25157157 PMCID PMC4246970

    Environmentally induced alterations in the commensal microbiota have been implicated in the increasing prevalence of food allergy. We show here that sensitization to a food allergen is increased in mice that have been treated with antibiotics or are devoid of a commensal microbiota. By selective...
  15. Commensal bacteria protect against food allergen sensitization.

    PNAS 111(36):13145 (2014) PMID 25157157 PMCID PMC4246970

    Environmentally induced alterations in the commensal microbiota have been implicated in the increasing prevalence of food allergy. We show here that sensitization to a food allergen is increased in mice that have been treated with antibiotics or are devoid of a commensal microbiota. By selective...
  16. Finding the missing links among metabolites, microbes, and the host.

    Immunity 40(6):824 (2014) PMID 24950202

    The unexpected diversity of the human microbiome and metabolome far exceeds the complexity of the human genome. Although we now understand microbial taxonomic and genetic repertoires in some populations, we are just beginning to assemble the necessary computational and experimental tools to unde...
  17. Finding the missing links among metabolites, microbes, and the host.

    Immunity 40(6):824 (2014) PMID 24950202 PMCID PMC4503329

    The unexpected diversity of the human microbiome and metabolome far exceeds the complexity of the human genome. Although we now understand microbial taxonomic and genetic repertoires in some populations, we are just beginning to assemble the necessary computational and experimental tools to unde...
  18. Microbial learning lessons: SFB educate the immune system.

    Immunity 40(4):457 (2014) PMID 24745329

    Segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB) contribute to immune-system maturation. In this issue of Immunity, Goto et al. (2014) and Lécuyer et al. (2014) provide evidence for how SFB induce antigen-specific T helper 17 cells and promote development of adaptive immunity at discrete mucosal sites. Copy...
  19. Microbial learning lessons: SFB educate the immune system.

    Immunity 40(4):457 (2014) PMID 24745329

    Segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB) contribute to immune-system maturation. In this issue of Immunity, Goto et al. (2014) and Lécuyer et al. (2014) provide evidence for how SFB induce antigen-specific T helper 17 cells and promote development of adaptive immunity at discrete mucosal sites. Copy...
  20. Gut microbiota promote hematopoiesis to control bacterial infection.

    Cell Host & Microbe 15(3):374 (2014) PMID 24629343 PMCID PMC4144825

    The commensal microbiota impacts specific immune cell populations and their functions at peripheral sites, such as gut mucosal tissues. However, it remains unknown whether gut microbiota control immunity through regulation of hematopoiesis at primary immune sites. We reveal that germ-free mice d...