1. Why did evolution give us allergies?

    Current Biology 25(2):R53 (2015) PMID 25756128

    The questions of why allergies exist and why they are becoming more prevalent continue to puzzle immunologists. Recent research has uncovered a wealth of details and in the process grown an impenetrable hedge of acronyms around the issue, but the answers may be hidden elsewhere, in the ecology a...
  2. The joy of science communication.

    Current Biology 25(1):R27 (2015) PMID 25713822

  3. CORR Insights®: Does the use of ultrasound affect contamination of musculoskeletal injections sites?

    Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research 473(1):358 (2015) PMID 25224822

  4. Depression in athletes: prevalence and risk factors.

    Current Sports Medicine Reports 14(1):56 (2015) PMID 25574886

    Depression affects an estimated 6.7% of today's adult population in a 12-month period. The prevalence rates for certain age groups, such as young adults and older adults, are higher. There are approximately 400,000 National Collegiate Athletic Association student athletes competing each year and...
  5. Depression in athletes: prevalence and risk factors.

    Current Sports Medicine Reports 14(1):56 (2015) PMID 25574886

    Depression affects an estimated 6.7% of today's adult population in a 12-month period. The prevalence rates for certain age groups, such as young adults and older adults, are higher. There are approximately 400,000 National Collegiate Athletic Association student athletes competing each year and...
  6. Our shared burden of diseases.

    Current Biology 24(24):R1139 (2014) PMID 25657996

    At the end of the year that saw Ebola virus disease dominate the news, experts warn that other zoonoses also pose serious threats. To prepare for disease outbreaks and avoid global epidemics, health services and researchers may have to adopt a broader perspective, known as the 'One Health' parad...
  7. Plant science called up to provide food security.

    Current Biology 24(23):R1105 (2014) PMID 25606585

    The fundamental understanding of plant biochemistry, physiology and genetics, along with insights into ecology, plant evolution and the domestication of common crop species will have to serve agricultural applications to ensure that the growing population of our rapidly changing planet will have...
  8. How wild do you want to go?

    Current Biology 24(22):R1067 (2014) PMID 25610931

    Urbanisation, efficiency improvement in agriculture, and the transition to a post-industrial economy in Europe and North America has taken large areas of land out of human use that could be returned to a ‘natural’ state. But what exactly is natural, and how much or how little ecosystem engineeri...
  9. Will the Nicaragua Canal connect or divide?

    Current Biology 24(21):R1023 (2014) PMID 25587585

    A century after the opening of the Panama Canal, a second inter-oceanic passage is set to be built in Central America, this time in Nicaragua. The ambitious and astronomically expensive project promises to bring economic opportunity to a poor country but it also carries risks to its tropical eco...
  10. Will the Nicaragua Canal connect or divide?

    Current Biology 24(21):R1023 (2014)

    A century after the opening of the Panama Canal, a second inter-oceanic passage is set to be built in Central America, this time in Nicaragua. The ambitious and astronomically expensive project promises to bring economic opportunity to a poor country but it also carries risks to its tr...
  11. New hopes for gene therapy.

    Current Biology 24(20):R983 (2014) PMID 25587582

  12. Shrinking ice caps in the spotlight.

    Current Biology 24(19):R941 (2014) PMID 25422833

    From the disappearing sea ice of the Arctic to the thriving microbial communities in subglacial lakes of Antarctica, the Earth's ice caps have often made the news in recent months and years, and polar science has emerged as being crucial to our understanding of our planet's biology and climate. ...
  13. Shrinking ice caps in the spotlight

    Current Biology 24(19):R941 (2014)

    From the disappearing sea ice of the Arctic to the thriving microbial communities in subglacial lakes of Antarctica, the Earth’s ice caps have often made the news in recent months and years, and polar science has emerged as being crucial to our understanding of our planet’s biology and...
  14. Silver linings for patients with depression?

    Current Biology 24(18):R851 (2014)

    Depression has become one of the biggest health problems globally, but in certain places more than in others, suggesting cultural as well as biological causes. Neuroscientists are only beginning to understand underlying processes and to develop effective treatments for those cases wher...
  15. Silver linings for patients with depression?

    Current Biology 24(18):R851 (2014) PMID 25374973

    Depression has become one of the biggest health problems globally, but in certain places more than in others, suggesting cultural as well as biological causes. Neuroscientists are only beginning to understand underlying processes and to develop effective treatments for those cases where conventi...
  16. Paraphilia or perversion?

    Current Biology 24(17):R777 (2014) PMID 25340211

    Human sexual instincts can become fixated on a wide variety of targets, resulting in behaviours ranging from harmless fetishism to child abuse. The recent flood of investigations into historic cases in the UK has brought child protection issues to the top of the news agenda and shown that societ...
  17. Paraphilia or perversion?

    Current Biology 24(17):R777 (2014)

    Human sexual instincts can become fixated on a wide variety of targets, resulting in behaviours ranging from harmless fetishism to child abuse. The recent flood of investigations into historic cases in the UK has brought child protection issues to the top of the news agenda and shown t...
  18. Systemic pesticide concerns extend beyond the bees.

    Current Biology 24(16):R717 (2014) PMID 25275174

  19. Self, medicated.

    American Journal of Public Health 104(8):1348 (2014) PMID 24922146

  20. Connecting with the natural world

    Current Biology 24(14):R629 (2014)

    Today’s technology, from smartphones to drones, provides researchers and conservation workers with many new and improved ways of observing and protecting wildlife. Michael Gross reports.