1. Effect of Oral Re-esterified Omega-3 Nutritional Supplementation on Dry Eyes.

    Cornea 35(9):1185 (2016) PMID 27442314 PMCID PMC4975557

    To assess the effect of oral re-esterified omega-3 fatty acids on tear osmolarity, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), tear break-up time (TBUT), Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI), fluorescein corneal staining, Schirmer score, meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) stage and omega-3 index in subjec...
  2. Fate of Australia's wildlife in the balance.

    Current Biology 26(7):R257 (2016) PMID 27504508

  3. Could plants have cognitive abilities?

    Current Biology 26(5):R181 (2016) PMID 27398417

    Vegetation is traditionally regarded as passive, doing nothing but what is essential to grow and survive. Evidence is accumulating, however, in support of formerly esoteric notions that plants can communicate, remember, even count--features that one would call cognitive if they were observed in ...
  4. Transitions to new concepts of gender.

    Current Biology 26(4):R141 (2016) PMID 27336092

  5. Feature: Chimpanzees, our cultured cousins.

    Current Biology 26(3):R83 (2016) PMID 27280267

  6. Prevalence of clinically elevated depressive symptoms in college athletes and differences by gender and sport.

    British Journal of Sports Medicine 50(3):167 (2016) PMID 26782764

    There are approximately 400,000 National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) student athletes and 5-7 million high school student athletes competing each year. According to the US Department of Health and Human Services, the depression prevalence rate for young adults, which ranges from 10% t...
  7. World under water.

    Current Biology 26(2):R47 (2016) PMID 27213204

    The Paris accord on climate change set an ambitious target of limiting climate change to 1.5°C, but the signatories appear to be in no hurry to undertake the revolutionary steps that would be necessary to achieve this. Meanwhile, ‘exceptional’ flooding events are becoming the new normal around t...
  8. Megafauna moves nutrients uphill.

    Current Biology 26(1):R1 (2016) PMID 27158721

    Large animals have a disproportionate capacity to transport nutrients along gradients and against water flow directions, making them more available to ecosystems and ultimately saving them from disappearing in sea floor sediments. Megafauna extinctions have reduced this capacity dramatically, wh...
  9. A fire with global connections.

    Current Biology 25(23):R1107 (2015) PMID 27027133

  10. How nature copes with climate change.

    Current Biology 25(22):R1057 (2015) PMID 26904762

    As the world is about to find out whether or not our civilisation is up to the challenge of dealing with climate change, research shows a wide range of responses from other species, which may benefit or suffer from the change, and mitigate it or make it worse. Michael Gross reports.
  11. Deep sea in deep trouble?

    Current Biology 25(21) (2015)

    Ahead of the imminent start of the industrial exploitation of deep sea resources, an EU report finds that scientific knowledge and understanding of this environment and its ecosystems still fall short of what would be needed for a sustainable use. Michael Gross reports.
  12. Deep sea in deep trouble?

    Current Biology 25(21):R1019 (2015) PMID 26839938

    Ahead of the imminent start of the industrial exploitation of deep sea resources, an EU report finds that scientific knowledge and understanding of this environment and its ecosystems still fall short of what would be needed for a sustainable use.
  13. Can we change our predatory ways?

    Current Biology 25(20):R965 (2015)

    As a top predator using rifles and harpoons, humans are shaping ecosystems in a unique way, often killing the wrong animals for the wrong reasons. Considering the ongoing crises of mass extinction and climate change, which is boosted by meat farming, we should employ our species-defini...
  14. Can we change our predatory ways?

    Current Biology 25(20):R965 (2015) PMID 26783569

    As a top predator using rifles and harpoons, humans are shaping ecosystems ina unique way, often killing the wrong animals for the wrong reasons. Considering the ongoing crises of mass extinction and climate change, which is boosted by meat farming, we should employ our species-defining intellig...
  15. How life shaped Earth.

    Current Biology 25(19):R847 (2015) PMID 26726334

    Earth is much more complex than all the other solar system objects that we know. Thanks to its rich and diverse geology, our planet can offer habitats to a wide range of living species. Emerging insights suggest that this is not just a happy coincidence, but that life itself has in many ways hel...
  16. How life shaped Earth

    Current Biology 25(19):R847 (2015)

    Earth is much more complex than all the other solar system objects that we know. Thanks to its rich and diverse geology, our planet can offer habitats to a wide range of living species. Emerging insights suggest that this is not just a happy coincidence, but that life itself has in man...
  17. Intelligent life without bones.

    Current Biology 25(18):R775 (2015) PMID 26649367

  18. Intelligent life without bones

    Current Biology 25(18):R775 (2015)

    The first genome sequence of a cephalopod species, together with comprehensive functional annotation, offers a glimpse at how nature achieved complex functions and indeed intelligence in a lineage independent of vertebrates. It thus allows a more general view on complex life that could...
  19. Are dogs just like us?

    Current Biology 25(17):R733 (2015) PMID 26561653

    Dogs have evolved to become the animal species most integrated with human society. Surprisingly, the origins and mechanisms of the remarkable co-evolution are still obscure and provide fuel for debates. Brain imaging studies showing up similarities and recent results implicating the hormone oxyt...
  20. Learning to live with landscape fires.

    Current Biology 25(16):R693 (2015) PMID 26516637

    Catastrophic wildfires have become more frequent in the last few decades. The standard depiction in the media of fires as a disaster that has to be avoided and stopped at all cost fails to do justice to a more complex ecological balance of destruction and new growth. The emerging discipline of p...