1. A Massive Expansion of Effector Genes Underlies Gall-Formation in the Wheat Pest Mayetiola destructor.

    Current Biology 25(5):613 (2015) PMID 25660540

    Gall-forming arthropods are highly specialized herbivores that, in combination with their hosts, produce extended phenotypes with unique morphologies [1]. Many are economically important, and others have improved our understanding of ecology and adaptive radiation [2]. However, the mechanisms th...
  2. A Massive Expansion of Effector Genes Underlies Gall-Formation in the Wheat Pest Mayetiola destructor

    Current Biology (2014)

    • The plant galling Mayetiola destructor genome is replete with effector genes • The SSGP-71 effector gene family is the largest known arthropod gene family. ...
  3. Increased area of a highly suitable host crop increases herbivore pressure in intensified agricultural landscapes

    Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment 186:135 (2014)

    • Increasing natural habitat cover has no effects on Cephus cinctus, a major pest of wheat, or its natural enemies. • Pest infestation in wheat increases significa...
  4. Increased area of a highly suitable host crop increases herbivore pressure in intensified agricultural landscapes

    Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment 186:135 (2014)

    • Increasing natural habitat cover has no effects on Cephus cinctus, a major pest of wheat, or its natural enemies. • Pest infestation in wheat increases significa...
  5. Increased area of a highly suitable host crop increases herbivore pressure in intensified agricultural landscapes

    Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment 186:135 (2014)

    • Increasing natural habitat cover has no effects on Cephus cinctus, a major pest of wheat, or its natural enemies. • Pest infestation in wheat increases significa...
  6. Increased area of a highly suitable host crop increases herbivore pressure in intensified agricultural landscapes

    Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment 186:135 (2014)

    • Increasing natural habitat cover has no effects on Cephus cinctus, a major pest of wheat, or its natural enemies. • Pest infestation in wheat increases significa...
  7. Avirulence effector discovery in a plant galling and plant parasitic arthropod, the Hessian fly (Mayetiola destructor).

    PLoS ONE 9(6):e100958 (2014) PMID 24964065 PMCID PMC4071006

    Highly specialized obligate plant-parasites exist within several groups of arthropods (insects and mites). Many of these are important pests, but the molecular basis of their parasitism and its evolution are poorly understood. One hypothesis is that plant parasitic arthropods use effector protei...
  8. Avirulence effector discovery in a plant galling and plant parasitic arthropod, the Hessian fly (Mayetiola destructor).

    PLoS ONE 9(6):e100958 (2014) PMID 24964065 PMCID PMC4071006

    Highly specialized obligate plant-parasites exist within several groups of arthropods (insects and mites). Many of these are important pests, but the molecular basis of their parasitism and its evolution are poorly understood. One hypothesis is that plant parasitic arthropods use effector protei...
  9. Sex- and tissue-specific profiles of chemosensory gene expression in a herbivorous gall-inducing fly (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae).

    BMC Genomics 15:501 (2014) PMID 24948464 PMCID PMC4230025

    The chemical senses of insects mediate behaviors that are closely linked to survival and reproduction. The order Diptera contains two model organisms, the vinegar fly Drosophila melanogaster and the mosquito Anopheles gambiae, whose chemosensory genes have been extensively studied. Representing ...
  10. Sex- and tissue-specific profiles of chemosensory gene expression in a herbivorous gall-inducing fly (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae).

    BMC Genomics 15:501 (2014) PMID 24948464 PMCID PMC4230025

    The chemical senses of insects mediate behaviors that are closely linked to survival and reproduction. The order Diptera contains two model organisms, the vinegar fly Drosophila melanogaster and the mosquito Anopheles gambiae, whose chemosensory genes have been extensively studied. Representing ...
  11. The adult head morphology of the hessian fly Mayetiola destructor (Diptera, Cecidomyiidae).

    Journal of Morphology 274(11):i (2013) PMID 24132950

    Cover illustration. Mayetiola destructor is a major pest of wheat in Europe, North Africa and North America. In this issue of the Journal of Morphology, Schneeberg et al. (pp. 1299-1311) investigate the adult head structures of the cecidomyiid fly and compared their findings with evolutionarily ...
  12. The adult head morphology of the hessian fly Mayetiola destructor (Diptera, Cecidomyiidae).

    Journal of Morphology 274(11):1299 (2013) PMID 24026972

    The adult head of the Hessian fly Mayetiola destructor was examined and described in detail. Morphological features are evaluated with respect to phylogenetic implications and possible effects of miniaturisation. Preserved groundplan features of Diptera are the orthognathous orientation of the h...
  13. The adult head morphology of the hessian fly Mayetiola destructor (Diptera, Cecidomyiidae).

    Journal of Morphology 274(11):1299 (2013) PMID 24026972

    The adult head of the Hessian fly Mayetiola destructor was examined and described in detail. Morphological features are evaluated with respect to phylogenetic implications and possible effects of miniaturisation. Preserved groundplan features of Diptera are the orthognathous orientation of the h...
  14. The adult head morphology of the hessian fly Mayetiola destructor (Diptera, Cecidomyiidae).

    Journal of Morphology 274(11):i (2013) PMID 24132950

    Cover illustration. Mayetiola destructor is a major pest of wheat in Europe, North Africa and North America. In this issue of the Journal of Morphology, Schneeberg et al. (pp. 1299-1311) investigate the adult head structures of the cecidomyiid fly and compared their findings with evolutionarily ...
  15. Pollination of a threatened orchid by an introduced hawk moth species in the tallgrass prairie of North America

    Biological Conservation 167:316 (2013)

    The decline of the threatened western prairie fringed orchid (Platanthera praeclara Sheviak and Bowles) is associated with destruction of the tallgrass prairie in North America. The role of pollinators in conservation and recovery is not well understood. We studied interactions with ha...
  16. Why oviposit there? Fitness consequences of a gall midge choosing the plant's youngest leaf.

    Environmental Entomology 42(1):123 (2013) PMID 23339793

    For animals that lay eggs, a longstanding question is, why do females choose particular oviposition sites? For insects that lay eggs on plants there are three hypotheses: maximizing suitable habitat for juveniles, maximizing female lifespan, and maximizing egg survival. We investigated the func...
  17. Why oviposit there? Fitness consequences of a gall midge choosing the plant's youngest leaf.

    Environmental Entomology 42(1):123 (2013) PMID 23339793

    For animals that lay eggs, a longstanding question is, why do females choose particular oviposition sites? For insects that lay eggs on plants there are three hypotheses: maximizing suitable habitat for juveniles, maximizing female lifespan, and maximizing egg survival. We investigated the func...
  18. Gall midges (Hessian flies) as plant pathogens.

    Phytopathology 50:339 (2012) PMID 22656645

    Gall midges constitute an important group of plant-parasitic insects. The Hessian fly (HF; Mayetiola destructor), the most investigated gall midge, was the first insect hypothesized to have a gene-for-gene interaction with its host plant, wheat (Triticum spp.). Recent investigations support that...
  19. Gall midges (Hessian flies) as plant pathogens.

    Phytopathology 50:339 (2012) PMID 22656645

    Gall midges constitute an important group of plant-parasitic insects. The Hessian fly (HF; Mayetiola destructor), the most investigated gall midge, was the first insect hypothesized to have a gene-for-gene interaction with its host plant, wheat (Triticum spp.). Recent investigations support that...
  20. No fitness cost for wheat's H gene-mediated resistance to Hessian fly (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae).

    Journal of Economic Entomology 104(4):1393 (2011) PMID 21882709

    Resistance (R) genes have a proven record for protecting plants against biotic stress. A problem is parasite adaptation via Avirulence (Avr) mutations, which allows the parasite to colonize the R gene plant. Scientists hope to make R genes more durable by stacking them in a single cultivar. Howe...