1. Expansion load: recessive mutations and the role of standing genetic variation.

    Molecular Ecology 24(9):2084 (2015) PMID 25786336

    Expanding populations incur a mutation burden - the so-called expansion load. Previous studies of expansion load have focused on codominant mutations. An important consequence of this assumption is that expansion load stems exclusively from the accumulation of new mutations occurring in individu...
  2. Expansion load and the evolutionary dynamics of a species range.

    American Naturalist 185(4):E81 (2015) PMID 25811091

    Expanding populations incur a mutation burden, the so-called expansion load. Using a mixture of individual-based simulations and analytical modeling, we study the expansion load process in models where population growth depends on the population's fitness (i.e., hard selection). We show that exp...
  3. Inference of Evolutionary Forces Acting on Human Biological Pathways.

    Genome Biology and Evolution 7(6):1546 (2015) PMID 25971280 PMCID PMC4494071

    Because natural selection is likely to act on multiple genes underlying a given phenotypic trait, we study here the potential effect of ongoing and past selection on the genetic diversity of human biological pathways. We first show that genes included in gene sets are generally under stronger se...
  4. Detection of convergent genome-wide signals of adaptation to tropical forests in humans.

    PLoS ONE 10(4):e0121557 (2015) PMID 25849546 PMCID PMC4388690

    Tropical forests are believed to be very harsh environments for human life. It is unclear whether human beings would have ever subsisted in those environments without external resources. It is therefore possible that humans have developed recent biological adaptations in response to specific sel...
  5. Prehistoric genomes reveal the genetic foundation and cost of horse domestication.

    PNAS 111(52):E5661 (2014) PMID 25512547 PMCID PMC4284583

    The domestication of the horse ∼ 5.5 kya and the emergence of mounted riding, chariotry, and cavalry dramatically transformed human civilization. However, the genetics underlying horse domestication are difficult to reconstruct, given the near extinction of wild horses. We therefore sequenced tw...
  6. Prehistoric genomes reveal the genetic foundation and cost of horse domestication.

    PNAS 111(52):E5661 (2014) PMID 25512547

    The domestication of the horse ∼5.5 kya and the emergence of mounted riding, chariotry, and cavalry dramatically transformed human civilization. However, the genetics underlying horse domestication are difficult to reconstruct, given the near extinction of wild horses. We therefore sequenced two...
  7. Prehistoric genomes reveal the genetic foundation and cost of horse domestication.

    PNAS 111(52):E5661 (2014) PMID 25512547 PMCID PMC4284583

    The domestication of the horse ∼ 5.5 kya and the emergence of mounted riding, chariotry, and cavalry dramatically transformed human civilization. However, the genetics underlying horse domestication are difficult to reconstruct, given the near extinction of wild horses. We therefore sequenced tw...
  8. Prehistoric genomes reveal the genetic foundation and cost of horse domestication.

    PNAS 111(52):E5661 (2014) PMID 25512547 PMCID PMC4284583

    The domestication of the horse ∼5.5 kya and the emergence of mounted riding, chariotry, and cavalry dramatically transformed human civilization. However, the genetics underlying horse domestication are difficult to reconstruct, given the near extinction of wild horses. We therefore sequenced two...
  9. Impact of range expansions on current human genomic diversity

    Current Opinion in Genetics & Development 29:22 (2014)

    The patterns of population genetic diversity depend to a large extent on past demographic history. Most human populations are known to have gone recently through a series of range expansions within and out of Africa, but these spatial expansions are rarely taken into account when inter...
  10. Impact of range expansions on current human genomic diversity

    Current Opinion in Genetics & Development 29:22 (2014)

    The patterns of population genetic diversity depend to a large extent on past demographic history. Most human populations are known to have gone recently through a series of range expansions within and out of Africa, but these spatial expansions are rarely taken into account when inter...
  11. Impact of range expansions on current human genomic diversity.

    Current Opinion in Genetics & Development 29:22 (2014) PMID 25156518

    The patterns of population genetic diversity depend to a large extent on past demographic history. Most human populations are known to have gone recently through a series of range expansions within and out of Africa, but these spatial expansions are rarely taken into account when interpreting ob...
  12. Impact of range expansions on current human genomic diversity.

    Current Opinion in Genetics & Development 29:22 (2014) PMID 25156518

    The patterns of population genetic diversity depend to a large extent on past demographic history. Most human populations are known to have gone recently through a series of range expansions within and out of Africa, but these spatial expansions are rarely taken into account when interpreting ob...
  13. Impact of range expansions on current human genomic diversity

    Current Opinion in Genetics & Development 29:22 (2014)

    The patterns of population genetic diversity depend to a large extent on past demographic history. Most human populations are known to have gone recently through a series of range expansions within and out of Africa, but these spatial expansions are rarely taken into account when inter...
  14. Impact of range expansions on current human genomic diversity

    Current Opinion in Genetics & Development 29:22 (2014)

    The patterns of population genetic diversity depend to a large extent on past demographic history. Most human populations are known to have gone recently through a series of range expansions within and out of Africa, but these spatial expansions are rarely taken into account when inter...
  15. Widespread signals of convergent adaptation to high altitude in Asia and america.

    The American Journal of Human Genetics 95(4):394 (2014) PMID 25262650 PMCID PMC4185124

    Living at high altitude is one of the most difficult challenges that humans had to cope with during their evolution. Whereas several genomic studies have revealed some of the genetic bases of adaptations in Tibetan, Andean, and Ethiopian populations, relatively little evidence of convergent evol...
  16. Widespread signals of convergent adaptation to high altitude in Asia and america.

    The American Journal of Human Genetics 95(4):394 (2014) PMID 25262650 PMCID PMC4185124

    Living at high altitude is one of the most difficult challenges that humans had to cope with during their evolution. Whereas several genomic studies have revealed some of the genetic bases of adaptations in Tibetan, Andean, and Ethiopian populations, relatively little evidence of convergent evol...
  17. Adaptive, convergent origins of the pygmy phenotype in African rainforest hunter-gatherers.

    PNAS 111(35):E3596 (2014) PMID 25136101 PMCID PMC4156716

    The evolutionary history of the human pygmy phenotype (small body size), a characteristic of African and Southeast Asian rainforest hunter-gatherers, is largely unknown. Here we use a genome-wide admixture mapping analysis to identify 16 genomic regions that are significantly associated with the...
  18. Adaptive, convergent origins of the pygmy phenotype in African rainforest hunter-gatherers.

    PNAS 111(35):E3596 (2014) PMID 25136101 PMCID PMC4156716

    The evolutionary history of the human pygmy phenotype (small body size), a characteristic of African and Southeast Asian rainforest hunter-gatherers, is largely unknown. Here we use a genome-wide admixture mapping analysis to identify 16 genomic regions that are significantly associated with the...
  19. Adaptive, convergent origins of the pygmy phenotype in African rainforest hunter-gatherers.

    PNAS 111(35):E3596 (2014) PMID 25136101 PMCID PMC4156716

    The evolutionary history of the human pygmy phenotype (small body size), a characteristic of African and Southeast Asian rainforest hunter-gatherers, is largely unknown. Here we use a genome-wide admixture mapping analysis to identify 16 genomic regions that are significantly associated with the...
  20. Adaptive, convergent origins of the pygmy phenotype in African rainforest hunter-gatherers.

    PNAS 111(35):E3596 (2014) PMID 25136101 PMCID PMC4156716

    The evolutionary history of the human pygmy phenotype (small body size), a characteristic of African and Southeast Asian rainforest hunter-gatherers, is largely unknown. Here we use a genome-wide admixture mapping analysis to identify 16 genomic regions that are significantly associated with the...