1. Dating the origin of hepatitis B virus reveals higher substitution rate and adaptation on the branch leading to F/H genotypes.

    Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 93:44 (2015) PMID 26220838

    The evolution of hepatitis B virus (HBV), particularly its origins and evolutionary timescale, has been the subject of debate. Three major scenarios have been proposed, variously placing the origin of HBV in humans and great apes from some million years to only a few thousand years ago (ka). To ...
  2. Uncertainty in the Timing of Origin of Animals and the Limits of Precision in Molecular Timescales.

    Current Biology 25(22):2939 (2015) PMID 26603774 PMCID PMC4651906

    The timing of divergences among metazoan lineages is integral to understanding the processes of animal evolution, placing the biological events of species divergences into the correct geological timeframe. Recent fossil discoveries and molecular clock dating studies have suggested a divergence o...
  3. Uncertainty in the timing of origin of animals and the limits of precision in molecular timescales

    Current Biology (2015)

    The timing of divergences among metazoan lineages is integral to understanding the processes of animal evolution, placing the biological events of species divergences into the correct geological time frame. Recent fossil discoveries and molecular clock dating studies have suggested a d...
  4. Global Dispersal Pattern of HIV Type 1 Subtype CRF01_AE: A Genetic Trace of Human Mobility Related to Heterosexual Sexual Activities Centralized in Southeast Asia.

    Journal of Infectious Diseases 211(11):1735 (2015) PMID 25512631

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) subtype CRF01_AE originated in Africa and then passed to Thailand, where it established a major epidemic. Despite the global presence of CRF01_AE, little is known about its subsequent dispersal pattern. We assembled a global data set of 2736 CRF01_AE s...
  5. Bayesian estimation of nonsynonymous/synonymous rate ratios for pairwise sequence comparisons.

    Molecular Biology and Evolution 31(7):1902 (2014) PMID 24748652 PMCID PMC4069626

    The nonsynonymous/synonymous rate ratio (ω = d(N)/d(S)) is an important measure of the mode and strength of natural selection acting on nonsynonymous mutations in protein-coding genes. The simplest such analysis is the estimation of the d(N)/d(S) ratio using two sequences. Both heuristic countin...