1. Observing supernova 1987A with the refurbished Hubble Space Telescope.

    Science 329(5999):1624 (2010) PMID 20813921

    Observations with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), conducted since 1990, now offer an unprecedented glimpse into fast astrophysical shocks in the young remnant of supernova 1987A. Comparing observations taken in 2010 with the use of the refurbished instruments on HST with data taken in 2004, ju...
  2. No supernovae associated with two long-duration gamma-ray bursts.

    Nature 444(7122):1047 (2006) PMID 17183316

    It is now accepted that long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are produced during the collapse of a massive star. The standard 'collapsar' model predicts that a broad-lined and luminous type Ic core-collapse supernova accompanies every long-duration GRB. This association has been confirmed in ob...
  3. The optical afterglow of the short gamma-ray burst GRB 050709.

    Nature 437(7060):859 (2005) PMID 16208365

    It has long been known that there are two classes of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), mainly distinguished by their durations. The breakthrough in our understanding of long-duration GRBs (those lasting more than approximately 2 s), which ultimately linked them with energetic type Ic supernovae, came fro...
  4. A very energetic supernova associated with the gamma-ray burst of 29 March 2003.

    Nature 423(6942):847 (2003) PMID 12815425

    Over the past five years evidence has mounted that long-duration (>2 s) gamma-ray bursts (GRBs)-the most luminous of all astronomical explosions-signal the collapse of massive stars in our Universe. This evidence was originally based on the probable association of one unusual GRB with a supernov...