1. Nuclear-Receptor-Mediated Telomere Insertion Leads to Genome Instability in ALT Cancers

    Cell 160(5):913 (2015)

    The breakage-fusion-bridge cycle is a classical mechanism of telomere-driven genome instability in which dysfunctional telomeres are fused to other chromosomal extremities, creating dicentric chromosomes that eventually break at mitosis. Here, we uncover a distinct pathway of telomere-...
  2. Nuclear-Receptor-Mediated Telomere Insertion Leads to Genome Instability in ALT Cancers

    Cell 160(5):913 (2015) PMID 25723166

    The breakage-fusion-bridge cycle is a classical mechanism of telomere-driven genome instability in which dysfunctional telomeres are fused to other chromosomal extremities, creating dicentric chromosomes that eventually break at mitosis. Here, we uncover a distinct pathway of telomere-...
  3. Nuclear-Receptor-Mediated Telomere Insertion Leads to Genome Instability in ALT Cancers.

    Cell 160(5):913 (2015) PMID 25723166

    The breakage-fusion-bridge cycle is a classical mechanism of telomere-driven genome instability in which dysfunctional telomeres are fused to other chromosomal extremities, creating dicentric chromosomes that eventually break at mitosis. Here, we uncover a distinct pathway of telomere-driven gen...
  4. Redundant Mechanisms to Form Silent Chromatin at Pericentromeric Regions Rely on BEND3 and DNA Methylation

    Molecular Cell 57(1):202 (2015)

  5. End-targeting proteomics of isolated chromatin segments of a mammalian ribosomal RNA gene promoter.

    Nature Communications 6:6674 (2015) PMID 25812914 PMCID PMC4389260

    The unbiased identification of proteins associated with specific loci is crucial for understanding chromatin-based processes. The proteomics of isolated chromatin fragment (PICh) method has previously been developed to purify telomeres and identify associated proteins. This approach is based on ...
  6. Constitutive heterochromatin formation and transcription in mammals.

    Epigenetics & Chromatin 8:3 (2015) PMID 25788984 PMCID PMC4363358

    Constitutive heterochromatin, mainly formed at the gene-poor regions of pericentromeres, is believed to ensure a condensed and transcriptionally inert chromatin conformation. Pericentromeres consist of repetitive tandem satellite repeats and are crucial chromosomal elements that are responsible ...
  7. Redundant Mechanisms to Form Silent Chromatin at Pericentromeric Regions Rely on BEND3 and DNA Methylation

    Molecular Cell 56(4):580 (2014) PMID 25457167

    Constitutive heterochromatin is typically defined by high levels of DNA methylation and H3 lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9Me3), whereas facultative heterochromatin displays DNA hypomethylation and high H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27Me3). The two chromatin types generally do not coexi...
  8. Redundant mechanisms to form silent chromatin at pericentromeric regions rely on BEND3 and DNA methylation.

    Molecular Cell 56(4):580 (2014) PMID 25457167

    Constitutive heterochromatin is typically defined by high levels of DNA methylation and H3 lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9Me3), whereas facultative heterochromatin displays DNA hypomethylation and high H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27Me3). The two chromatin types generally do not coexist at the ...
  9. Protein landscape at Drosophila melanogaster telomere-associated sequence repeats.

    Molecular and Cellular Biology 32(12):2170 (2012) PMID 22493064 PMCID PMC3372267

    The specific set of proteins bound at each genomic locus contributes decisively to regulatory processes and to the identity of a cell. Understanding of the function of a particular locus requires the knowledge of what factors interact with that locus and how the protein composition changes in di...
  10. Protein landscape at Drosophila melanogaster telomere-associated sequence repeats.

    Molecular and Cellular Biology 32(12):2170 (2012) PMID 22493064 PMCID PMC3372267

    The specific set of proteins bound at each genomic locus contributes decisively to regulatory processes and to the identity of a cell. Understanding of the function of a particular locus requires the knowledge of what factors interact with that locus and how the protein composition changes in di...
  11. How chromatin prevents genomic rearrangements: locus colocalization induced by transcription factor binding.

    Bioessays 34(2):90 (2012) PMID 22086436

    The loosening of chromatin structures gives rise to unrestricted access to DNA and thus transcription factors (TFs) can bind to their otherwise masked target sequences. Regions bound by the same set of TFs tend to be located in close proximity and this might increase the probability of activatin...
  12. How chromatin prevents genomic rearrangements: locus colocalization induced by transcription factor binding.

    Bioessays 34(2):90 (2012) PMID 22086436

    The loosening of chromatin structures gives rise to unrestricted access to DNA and thus transcription factors (TFs) can bind to their otherwise masked target sequences. Regions bound by the same set of TFs tend to be located in close proximity and this might increase the probability of activatin...
  13. Purification of proteins associated with specific genomic Loci.

    Cell 136(1):175 (2009) PMID 19135898 PMCID PMC3395431

    Eukaryotic DNA is bound and interpreted by numerous protein complexes in the context of chromatin. A description of the full set of proteins that regulate specific loci is critical to understanding regulation. Here, we describe a protocol called proteomics of isolated chromatin segments (PICh) t...
  14. Purification of Proteins Associated with Specific Genomic Loci

    Cell 136(1):175 (2009) PMID 19135898 PMCID PMC3395431

    Eukaryotic DNA is bound and interpreted by numerous protein complexes in the context of chromatin. A description of the full set of proteins that regulate specific loci is critical to understanding regulation. Here, we describe a protocol called proteomics of isolated c...
  15. Purification of Proteins Associated with Specific Genomic Loci

    Cell 136(1):175 (2009) PMID 19135898 PMCID PMC3395431

    Eukaryotic DNA is bound and interpreted by numerous protein complexes in the context of chromatin. A description of the full set of proteins that regulate specific loci is critical to understanding regulation. Here, we describe a protocol called proteomics of isolated c...
  16. Purification of Proteins Associated with Specific Genomic Loci

    Cell 136(1):175 (2009)

    Eukaryotic DNA is bound and interpreted by numerous protein complexes in the context of chromatin. A description of the full set of proteins that regulate specific loci is critical to understanding regulation. Here, we describe a protocol called proteomics of isolated c...
  17. The SR family proteins B52 and dASF/SF2 modulate development of the Drosophila visual system by regulating specific RNA targets.

    Molecular and Cellular Biology 27(8):3087 (2007) PMID 17283056 PMCID PMC1899935

    Deciphering the role of alternative splicing in developmental processes relies on the identification of key genes whose expression is controlled by splicing regulators throughout the growth of a whole organism. Modulating the expression levels of five SR proteins in the developing eye of Drosoph...
  18. The SR family proteins B52 and dASF/SF2 modulate development of the Drosophila visual system by regulating specific RNA targets.

    Molecular and Cellular Biology 27(8):3087 (2007) PMID 17283056 PMCID PMC1899935

    Deciphering the role of alternative splicing in developmental processes relies on the identification of key genes whose expression is controlled by splicing regulators throughout the growth of a whole organism. Modulating the expression levels of five SR proteins in the developing eye of Drosoph...
  19. Polycomb group-dependent Cyclin A repression in Drosophila.

    Genes & Development 20(4):501 (2006) PMID 16481477 PMCID PMC1369051

    Polycomb group (PcG) and trithorax group (trxG) proteins are well known for their role in the maintenance of silent and active expression states of homeotic genes. However, PcG proteins may also be required for the control of cellular proliferation in vertebrates. In Drosophila, PcG factors act ...
  20. Polycomb group-dependent Cyclin A repression in Drosophila.

    Genes & Development 20(4):501 (2006) PMID 16481477 PMCID PMC1369051

    Polycomb group (PcG) and trithorax group (trxG) proteins are well known for their role in the maintenance of silent and active expression states of homeotic genes. However, PcG proteins may also be required for the control of cellular proliferation in vertebrates. In Drosophila, PcG factors act ...