1. TRIM24 Is an Oncogenic Transcriptional Activator in Prostate Cancer.

    Cancer Cell 29(6):846 (2016) PMID 27238081

    Androgen receptor (AR) signaling is a key driver of prostate cancer (PC). While androgen-deprivation therapy is transiently effective in advanced disease, tumors often progress to a lethal castration-resistant state (CRPC). We show that recurrent PC-driver mutations in speckle-type POZ protein (...
  2. Light-Mediated Hormonal Regulation of Plant Growth and Development.

    Plant Biology 67:513 (2016) PMID 26905653

    Light is crucial for plant life, and perception of the light environment dictates plant growth, morphology, and developmental changes. Such adjustments in growth and development in response to light conditions are often established through changes in hormone levels and signaling. This review dis...
  3. Shadow on the Plant: A Strategy to Exit.

    Cell 164(1-2):15 (2016) PMID 26771482

    The light spectrum perceived by plants is affected by crowding, which results in the shade avoidance syndrome (SAS). Findings presented by Pedmale et al. bring cryptochromes to the forefront of SAS and elucidate a fascinating molecular crosstalk between photoreceptor systems operating in differe...
  4. Oxygen supply maps for hypoxic microenvironment visualization in prostate cancer.

    Journal of Pathology Informatics 7:3 (2016) PMID 26955501 PMCID PMC4763504

    Intratumoral hypoxia plays an important role with regard to tumor biology and susceptibility to radio- and chemotherapy. For further investigation of hypoxia-related changes, areas of certain hypoxia must be reliably detected within cancer tissues. Pimonidazole, a 2-nitroimindazole, accumulates ...
  5. Image-based computational quantification and visualization of genetic alterations and tumour heterogeneity.

    Scientific reports 6:24146 (2016) PMID 27052161 PMCID PMC4823793

    Recent large-scale genome analyses of human tissue samples have uncovered a high degree of genetic alterations and tumour heterogeneity in most tumour entities, independent of morphological phenotypes and histopathological characteristics. Assessment of genetic copy-number variation (CNV) and tu...
  6. Sensing the light environment in plants: photoreceptors and early signaling steps.

    Current Opinion in Neurobiology 34:46 (2015) PMID 25638281

    Plants must constantly adapt to a changing light environment in order to optimize energy conversion through the process of photosynthesis and to limit photodamage. In addition, plants use light cues for timing of key developmental transitions such as initiation of reproduction (transition to flo...
  7. Contrasting growth responses in lamina and petiole during neighbor detection depend on differential auxin responsiveness rather than different auxin levels.

    New Phytologist 208(1):198 (2015) PMID 25963518

    Foliar shade triggers rapid growth of specific structures that facilitate access of the plant to direct sunlight. In leaves of many plant species, this growth response is complex because, although shade triggers the elongation of petioles, it reduces the growth of the lamina. How the same extern...
  8. Plant Phototropic Growth

    Current Biology 25(9):R384 (2015) PMID 25942556

    Plants are photoautotrophic sessile organisms that use environmental cues to optimize multiple facets of growth and development. A classic example is phototropism — in shoots this is typically positive, leading to growth towards the light, while roots frequently show negative phototrop...
  9. Lipid anchoring of Arabidopsis phototropin 1 to assess the functional significance of receptor internalization: should I stay or should I go?

    New Phytologist 206(3):1038 (2015) PMID 25643813

    The phototropin 1 (phot1) blue light receptor mediates a number of adaptive responses, including phototropism, that generally serve to optimize photosynthetic capacity. Phot1 is a plasma membrane-associated protein, but upon irradiation, a fraction is internalized into the cytoplasm. Although th...
  10. Differentially phased leaf growth and movements in Arabidopsis depend on coordinated circadian and light regulation.

    Plant Cell 26(10):3911 (2014) PMID 25281688 PMCID PMC4247567

    In contrast to vastly studied hypocotyl growth, little is known about diel regulation of leaf growth and its coordination with movements such as changes in leaf elevation angle (hyponasty). We developed a 3D live-leaf growth analysis system enabling simultaneous monitoring of growth and movement...
  11. Auxin-mediated plant architectural changes in response to shade and high temperature.

    Physiologia Plantarum 151(1):13 (2014) PMID 24011166

    The remarkable plasticity of their architecture allows plants to adjust growth to the environment and to overcome adverse conditions. Two examples of environmental stresses that drastically affect shoot development are imminent shade and high temperature. Plants in crowded environments and plant...
  12. Light intensity modulates the regulatory network of the shade avoidance response in Arabidopsis.

    PNAS 111(17):6515 (2014) PMID 24733935 PMCID PMC4035961

    Plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana respond to foliar shade and neighbors who may become competitors for light resources by elongation growth to secure access to unfiltered sunlight. Challenges faced during this shade avoidance response (SAR) are different under a light-absorbing canopy and duri...
  13. Reduced phototropism in pks mutants may be due to altered auxin-regulated gene expression or reduced lateral auxin transport.

    Plant Journal 77(3):393 (2014) PMID 24286493

    Phototropism allows plants to orient their photosynthetic organs towards the light. In Arabidopsis, phototropins 1 and 2 sense directional blue light such that phot1 triggers phototropism in response to low fluence rates, while both phot1 and phot2 mediate this response under higher light condit...
  14. Plasma membrane H⁺ -ATPase regulation is required for auxin gradient formation preceding phototropic growth.

    Molecular Systems Biology 10:751 (2014) PMID 25261457 PMCID PMC4299663

    Phototropism is a growth response allowing plants to align their photosynthetic organs toward incoming light and thereby to optimize photosynthetic activity. Formation of a lateral gradient of the phytohormone auxin is a key step to trigger asymmetric growth of the shoot leading to phototropic r...
  15. Defining the site of light perception and initiation of phototropism in Arabidopsis.

    Current Biology 23(19):1934 (2013) PMID 24076239

    Phototropism is an adaptive response allowing plants to optimize photosynthetic light capture. This is achieved by asymmetric growth between the shaded and lit sides of the stimulated organ. In grass seedlings, the site of phototropin-mediated light perception is distinct from the site of bendin...
  16. Phototropism: at the crossroads of light-signaling pathways.

    Trends in Plant Science 18(7):393 (2013) PMID 23562459

    Phototropism enables plants to orient growth towards the direction of light and thereby maximizes photosynthesis in low-light environments. In angiosperms, blue-light photoreceptors called phototropins are primarily involved in sensing the direction of light. Phytochromes and cryptochromes (sens...
  17. D6PK AGCVIII kinases are required for auxin transport and phototropic hypocotyl bending in Arabidopsis.

    Plant Cell 25(5):1674 (2013) PMID 23709629 PMCID PMC3694699

    Phototropic hypocotyl bending in response to blue light excitation is an important adaptive process that helps plants to optimize their exposure to light. In Arabidopsis thaliana, phototropic hypocotyl bending is initiated by the blue light receptors and protein kinases phototropin1 (phot1) and ...
  18. Conditional involvement of constitutive photomorphogenic1 in the degradation of phytochrome A.

    Plant Physiology 161(4):2136 (2013) PMID 23391578 PMCID PMC3613482

    All higher plants possess multiple phytochrome photoreceptors, with phytochrome A (phyA) being light labile and other members of the family being relatively light stable (phyB-phyE in Arabidopsis [Arabidopsis thaliana]). phyA also differs from other members of the family because it enables plant...
  19. Verification at the protein level of the PIF4-mediated external coincidence model for the temperature-adaptive photoperiodic control of plant growth in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Plant Signaling & Behavior 8(3):e23390 (2013) PMID 23299336 PMCID PMC3676505

    Plant circadian clock controls a wide variety of physiological and developmental events, which include the short-days (SDs)-specific promotion of the elongation of hypocotyls during de-etiolation and also the elongation of petioles during vegetative growth. In A. thaliana, the PIF4 gene encoding...
  20. Phosphorylation of phytochrome B inhibits light-induced signaling via accelerated dark reversion in Arabidopsis.

    Plant Cell 25(2):535 (2013) PMID 23378619 PMCID PMC3608776

    The photoreceptor phytochrome B (phyB) interconverts between the biologically active Pfr (λmax = 730 nm) and inactive Pr (λmax = 660 nm) forms in a red/far-red-dependent fashion and regulates, as molecular switch, many aspects of light-dependent development in Arabidopsis thaliana. phyB signalin...